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The National Recycling Coalition 2017 Awards Recipients

The National Recycling Coalition 2017 Awards Recipients

Contacts:
Savannah Betkowski, NRC Staff; (202) 618-2107
Lisa Skumatz, Awards Chair [email protected]; 303/913-4229

This August, The National Recycling Coalition honored their recycling awards recipients at the 2017 Resource Recycling Conference in Minneapolis. The awards were presented to the winners, along with the recipients of the Murray J. Fox Scholarship, at the Conference Welcome Reception hosted by the NRC and the Recycling Association of Minnesota.

The awards program is designed to honor and recognize outstanding individuals, programs, and organizations around the country, both for their achievements, and to serve as a model and a resource for learning for NRC members. Award categories include higher education, not- for and for-profit organizations, business leadership, and recognition of outstanding programs. The NRC will be posting information on all winners on the NRC’s website.

NRC’s Awards Committee Chair Lisa Skumatz commented on the process saying of fellow committee members, “They worked long and hard to sort from among the more than one hundred submittals to find those shining examples – a task that was made particularly hard because there were so many really stellar nominees. We were very pleased that winners came from across the country to accept their awards, so attendees had the chance to learn first-hand how these programs work so well!”

2017 Awards and Recipients

  • Outstanding Business Leadership For-Profit Company- Avaya Stadium (San José, CA)
  • Outstanding Not-for-profit Business Leadership- Cooperative Teamwork & Recycling Assistance: CTRA (Austin, TX)
    • Outstanding Not-for-profit Business Leadership Honorable Mention- Northeast Resource Recovery Association: NRRA
  • Outstanding Recycling Organization- the Michigan Recycling Coalition: MRC
  • Outstanding Higher Education- the University of Florida
    • Outstanding Higher Education Honorable Mention- The University of Illinois at Chicago, Office of Sustainability
  • Outstanding Community or Government Program- South Central Solid Waste Authority: SCSWA
    • Outstanding Community or Government Program Honorable Mention- Emmet County (MI) Recycling
  • Bill Heenan Emerging Leader- Samantha Yager: Recycling Coordinator for the City of Columbia, SC & Tori Carle: City of Greensboro (NC) Recycling Educator at ‘Operation Bed Roll’
    • Bill Heenan Emerging Leader Honorable Mention- Matthew O’Carroll: Refuse, Recycling, & Water Efficiency Manager at UC Santa Barbara
  • Lifetime Achievement in Recycling- Arthur Boone, CA

Details of the Awards and Winners 

Outstanding Business Leadership For-Profit Company: Avaya Stadium
In 2015, the San Jose Earthquakes opened Avaya Stadium, an 18,000 seat, LEED Silver-certified building. The team’s dedication to environmental stewardship goes above and beyond their certification; the team installed an edible garden, offers reusable bags and cups instead of disposables, participates in Earth Day programs, and promotes junk pickup, recycling, proper hazardous waste disposal, and litter reduction messages.

From conception through completion and programming, Avaya Stadium has shown outstanding leadership in its commitment to sustainability. Not only is this a LEED certified building, but during construction, all existing concrete was removed and fully recycled, and 90% of the stadium’s steel is recycled steel content. The 3,500 feet of wood lining the suites, press box, concession stands, and scoreboard bar is recycled 100-year old wood from the historic Hangar One at Moffett Field, just a few miles away from the stadium. The stadium maintains its xeriscaped grounds with reclaimed water using a smart clock sprinkler system and is powered with solar panels installed throughout the parking structure. No waste generated at the stadium goes directly to landfill. All material is sorted and organics, including food waste, are anaerobically digested converting waste to energy. As only the 15th soccer stadium in the MLS, they are a perfect example of business leadership and commitment to the environment.

Outstanding Not-for-profit Business Leadership: Cooperative Teamwork & Recycling Assistance (CTRA)
Texas consists of many rural communities and sparsely populated areas. Because of their size and remote locations, many of these entities are unable to establish cost effective recycling programs. For over 20 years, Cooperative Teamwork & Recycling Assistance (CTRA) has been the only nonprofit cooperative marketing organization in Texas. CTRA currently consists of 52 recycling cooperatives who serve more than 500 entities, 500,000+ Texas citizens, and covers a service area of over 43,000 square miles. The goal of CTRA’s partnerships is to establish, maintain or improve recycling as an economically viable option, for underserved rural communities. CTRA’s membership includes civic groups, private industry, military bases, government entities and school districts. The strength of the cooperative provides the bargaining power needed to negotiate higher commodity prices.

For members, CTRA serves as their liaison between the public and private sector by negotiating contracts with haulers and end markets at competitive prices. The collection, transport and sale of recyclables is coordinated through CTRA and its contractors. CTRA helps community recycling programs to effectively increase the amount and quality of collected recycled materials. CTRA’s impact on recycling efforts in Texas has been substantial. From November 1995 through 2016, CTRA’s members has generated over $9,283,698 in revenue for these communities as well as saved over 396,879 yards of landfill space and $3,931,770 in landfill fees! As an outstanding business leader CRTA continuously promotes new programs and with groups across the nation and in Canada providing advice on establishing recycling cooperatives.

Outstanding Not-for-profit Business Leadership (Honorable Mention): Northeast Resource Recovery Association (NRRA)
One of the first recycling organizations in the country, NRRA has been leading the way in innovation and stewardship since 1981. It has been sought out to see how its model has been able to survive the recycling markets downturns that have resulted in several similar organizations either scaling back or ceasing operations altogether. NRRA has been servicing member towns in Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont, Connecticut and Rhode Island since 1995.

Since 1981 NRRA has adhered to its two-fold mission of “acting as a source of education in the field of solid waste management”, and “as a market development service”. Over 20 years ago NRRA recognized the issues surrounding the recycling of glass as fewer and fewer facilities would accept it for processing, and separation and hauling was a key challenge. NRRA worked to develop, and got approved in NH, the

“certified waste derived product” known as “Processed Glass Aggregate” (PGA). PGA was held out of the waste stream, consolidated at host sites, and crushed with a mobile crusher contracted by NRRA. The material was then used in municipal road beds, under parking lots and sidewalks, and culverts due to its intrinsic resistance to frost.

Since 2007 NRRA has moved over 750,000 tons of material, at the lowest cost or the highest revenues. It has grown to be the “one stop shop” for all things recycling and management of the entire waste stream. In smaller municipalities and towns waste stream management and recycling operations often fall to the DPW head or part time help. It is invaluable to have NRRA as the one reliable source to call.

Outstanding Recycling Organization: Michigan Recycling Coalition
One of the way Michigan Recycling Coalition exemplifies an outstanding recycling organization is the way it serves a broad membership through valuable education and outreach initiatives, connecting recycling professionals across the state through its conference, campaigns, and new regional outreach. To keep its members up to date and provide access to the most relevant information, MRC has developed a marketing campaign designed to raise awareness of and participation in recycling programs across the state; offers a Materials and Recycling Management Training series; promotes Regional Outreach through a Board driven initiative that encourages collaboration by regions; provides weekly newsletters, a recycling directory and has been holding annual conferences for the last 35 years.

The MRC demonstrated true leadership in 2011 with the release of “The State of Recycling in Michigan: A Way Forward”, a report which outlined the need for leadership and investment by the State of Michigan. This year they released the 2017 Report, “The State of Organics Recovery in Michigan: Priorities and Recommendations”. MRC is known for their strong partnerships, solid advocacy voice, and technical knowledge. Because of MRC’s efforts Michigan’s political leaders are taking notice. The attention and growth the industry is seeing is attributable to the hard work and success of the Michigan Recycling Coalition.

Outstanding Higher Education: University of Florida
For nearly three decades, the University of Florida has been a leader in recycling through its research, education and training, and campus operations. The cutting-edge research directed by UF’s Hinkley Center for Solid and Hazardous Waste Management has advanced knowledge leading to better regulation and policy around managing construction and demolition debris, hazardous waste, medical waste, recycling and reuse.

Students in the Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure & Environment engage in field and laboratory research related to waste management, landfill design and beneficial use of waste materials. The Training, Research and Education for Environmental Occupations Center offers a number of required training courses for operators of hazardous and solid waste facilities, including MRFs, C&D sorting and transfer stations. The UF Physical Plant Division provides recycling, reuse, and composting services to students, faculty and staff throughout the 2000- acre central campus. UF diverted 56.3% of its waste from landfills in 2016.

Outstanding Higher Education (Honorable Mention): University of Illinois-Chicago, Office of Sustainability
Since 2014, the undergraduate Sustainability Internship Program (SIP) at the University of Illinois at Chicago has combined fine-grained, hands on experience of dealing with “real world” problems with the broader issues of sustainability. Students work one-on- one with a professional mentor/manager at NGOs such as Good Food Festival/Family Farmed, and Chicago Resource Center to address specific issues throughout the semester.

UIC placements include Facilities Management, Dining Services, College of Medicine, Student Centers, Center for Literacy, and the UIC hospital. The seminar includes visits recycling centers and green buildings, as well as focused presentations on resume writing, campus recycling and green laboratories. The semester concludes with a poster presentation where students share their learning with friends, staff, and other mentors. Student work has supported zero-waste event planning, local food procurement, battery and pen recycling program implementation, laboratory glass redistribution and paper reduction. These experiences provide valuable sustainability-related work experiences and professional references.

Outstanding Community or Government Program: South Central Solid Waste Authority (SCSWA)
In 2009 the South Central Solid Waste Authority located in Las Cruces, New Mexico launched one of the state’s first large-scale curbside recycling programs. Since this time, they have set a strong example for recycling excellence in New Mexico. The Authority continues this trend by implementing new programs, adding services, educating residents, focusing on schools and being willing to serve as a leader and role-model in the state.

Accomplishments include a sustainable glass program in a state that has few existing markets for glass. Since April of 2014 their glass program has diverted over 600 tons from the waste stream and created a product that is beneficially used by the community, as well as providing raw materials for a local sand-blasting small business. The Authority has launched a community tire shredding program that diverted over 60,000 lbs. of shredded tires from the waste stream to the Dona Ana County International Jetport for beneficial use on their airfield. Additionally, the Solid Waste Authority hosts over 50 community litter clean ups each year and has expanded their school program to include all 3 school districts in Dona Ana County. They have diverted over 40,400 tons of household recyclables since 2011.

Outstanding Community or Government Program (Honorable Mention): Emmet County Recycling (MI)
Emmet County Recycling is the leading rural recycling program in Michigan. For over 27 years, the program’s guiding principles are to be: Convenient – with recycling collected curbside, residential and commercial and at 13 Drop Sites, Comprehensive – accepting over 60 materials for recycling, yard waste and food waste composting, and Cost effective -their Enterprise Fund and best-practice policies have created a sustainable funding model without county general fund dollars.

Over 80% of Emmet County residents use the recycling services. 42% of Emmet County’s waste is recycled—almost three times the state average of 15%. Operating curbside and drop site trucks, the Material Recovery Facility (MRF), and their education programs provides outstanding communication and service. Leveraging funding for rolling carts tripled curbside capacity to 100 gallons per household / week. Emmet’s MRF also serves three neighboring counties. They demonstrate leadership at the state level, with their director serving on the Governor’s Recycling Council. 

Bill Heenan Emerging Leader: Samantha Yager
Samantha Yager began her municipal government service as an intern in 2011 and in the past year, she was promoted to Solid Waste Assistant Superintendent and is now leading recycling education and operations for the City of Columbia. Samantha managed the $2.2 million carts conversion. It was her job to formulate a budget, delivery plan, educational plan, and to oversee the entire project. In the end, she produced a $250,000 budget savings, delivered 34,000 carts in 13 days and recorded a 60 percent increase in recovered materials.   Samantha’s efforts extend much further than the curbside program. She has added new recycling cans in Columbia’s hospitality districts and will bring recycling to Columbia’s more than 60 parks. She has put recycling in Columbia’s only professional sports team stadium. She has tripled program results that have been stagnant since 2007. Samantha has a bright future in solid waste and has the work ethic and eagerness to help improve the industry. 

Bill Heenan Emerging Leader: Tori Carle
Tori Carle, an avid Pinterest user, discovered the concept of turning unwanted shopping bags into plastic bag yarn – called plarn – that could be crocheted into a blanket-like mat. This craft project turned into a much bigger idea: use the plarn to create bed rolls that could be used as sleeping surfaces for people who sleep outside and need a barrier to keep from losing body heat to the ground. The bed rolls are better than traditional blankets because the plastic is waterproof, easy to clean, and doesn’t attract bugs like cloth. Each bedroll takes upward of 700 plastic bags and 60-100 hours to complete. We called the project Operation Bed Roll: Conserve, Crochet, Care.

Operation Bed Roll aims to teach residents about the non-recyclability of plastic bags in residential recycling containers. To spread this message in a unique way, Recycling Educator Tori Carle designed a workshop to train residents to turn plastic bags into portable sleeping surfaces for the homeless. They are a better alternative to traditional blankets because they are lightweight, easy-to-clean, and do not attract unwanted insects. In 2016, over 3,000 residents participated, 211 bed rolls we created, and an estimated 147,700 plastic bags were kept out of landfills. An additional 60 bed rolls* have been donated in 2017 as the project continues.

Bill Heenan Emerging Leader (Honorable Mention): Matthew O’Carroll
Matthew O’Carroll is responsible managing UCSB’s refuse, recycling, and waste management program, water resources and water efficiency efforts, and the integrated pest management (IPM) program. In this role he has been instrumental in driving sustainability forward on the UCSB campus. Some of his accomplishments include: leading a UCSB campaign to reduce potable water use (a 21% reduction since FY12-13), authoring UCSB’s 2013 Water Action Plan which received a best practice award at the California Higher Education Sustainability Conference (CHESC), increasing UCSB’s waste diversion rate by 14% in three years, receiving over $200k in grant funding for water conservation and efficiency efforts, introducing a campus-wide lab waste management program at UCSB, Co-Chairing the UC System Wide Waste Working Group, and helping UCSB take home a Best Practice Award from CHESC for his work on a project to Optimize Waste Management Services Through Stakeholder Engagement.

Matt has also been involved in the Statewide Zero Waste Plan and Best Practices tool kit. According to Hilary Beckmann, the associate Director of Sustainability at the UC office of the President (UCOP), “Matt has been an integral campus lead informing the development of a UC Statewide waste plan and a web based zero waste best practices tool kit for UC campuses. The tool kit includes reporting standards and methodologies for campus waste and recycling professionals (and affiliated staff).”

At only 28 years old, Matt has definitely emerged as a young leader in his field who is respected and loved by his colleagues. 

Lifetime Achievement in Recycling
Mr. Boone is a pioneer and leader in the California recycling scene. Fondly known as ARB or Boone, he has had three careers – Minister, Human Rights Executive and Recycler. At 79, Arthur is semiretired but still writes for technical journals, consults with businesses and public agencies, conducts small project grants and teaches a three-day Introduction to Recycling class for the Northern California Recycling Association (NCRA). A very active NCRA member, he served on the Board of Directors for 30 years. Since “retirement” he has made himself useful to the larger recycling community while pulling together his writings from the last 25 years, to which the website Center for Recycling Research is primarily dedicated.

Arthur is best known today for his 18 years producing and facilitating a one-day conference each spring for NCRA called Recycling Update. In fact it is a very popular innovations conference bringing together 25 speakers limited to ten minute presentations; some call it “speed dating for recyclers.” More than 300 people now attend this program; some of the content is posted on the NCRA website and YouTube. The format has been replicated across the country by other recycling organizations.

Most of his current time is spent in recycling as a volunteer. In the past five years, he has done various small research-related projects. He gets paid to teach two or three times a year, but he has a lot to do. If there were professors of recycling, Arthur might well be one, but there aren’t, so Arthur labors on as a practicing (though untenured) scholar.

Notable supporters and contributors of these awards include: Steel Recycling Institute- Dave Keeling; ISRI – Robin Weiner; Alpine Waste-Brent Hildebrand; EmergeKnowledge/Re-TRAC- Rick Penner; Skumatz Economic Research Associates – Lisa Skumatz; The Recycling Partnership – Dylan De Thomas; Pennsylvania Recycling Markets Center, Inc.-Bob Bylone; CU Boulder-Jack DeBell; Paper Recycling Coalition-Fran McPoland; George Dreckmann- NRC Board Member; Puerto Rico Recycling Coalition – Antonio Rios; Mid-America Recycling-Mick Barry; Key Energy – Gary Bilbro;

The National Recycling Coalition congratulates all of this year’s winners!


 

About the National Recycling Coalition (NRC):

The National Recycling Coalition is a non-profit organization focused on promoting and enhancing materials management in North America, with a network of more than 6,000 members extending across waste reduction, reuse, composting and recycling. For nearly 40 years, NRC has been a leader in driving education and policy around recycling. Learn more about the NRC at www.NRCRecycles.org

Posted in Uncategorized|

Deadline Extended: 2017 NRC Awards

Deadline Extended!!
NRC Awards – Nominations Due July 11, 2017 at 6pm Pacific time

The National Recycling Coalition announces the “Call for Nominations” for the 2017 Awards – with awards presented at the Resource Recycling Conference August 28-30, 2017 in Minneapolis. Spread the word!! Nominate the best programs or individual you know in the following categories:

  1. NRCs’s Lifetime Achievement Award – recognizing an outstanding individual with a lifetime of leadership and dedication to the field of recycling.
  2. Bill Heenan Emerging Leader Award – recognizing an outstanding individual aged 35 or under who has emerged as a leader in the field.
  3. Outstanding Recycling Organization – awarded to a State Recycling Organization with outstanding growth, programs, leadership, or which has made a substantial impact on the field.
  4. Outstanding Business Leadership – awarded to a for-profit company showing leadership, innovation, and success as a corporate model in recycling and diversion.
  5. Outstanding Non-Profit Business Leadership – awarded to a not-for-profit company showing leadership, innovation, and success as a corporate model in recycling and diversion.
  6. Outstanding Community or Government Program – awarded to a public (community / governmental) program showing innovation, progress, or success as a model for other public programs.
  7. Outstanding Higher Education Program – awarded to a college / university with an exceptional program in recycling or in connecting higher education and the industry in the areas of degrees, tech transfer, career services, etc.

Nominate Here

The criteria for each award follow. Nominate a worthy candidate (you may self-nominate) by clicking on the following link. For questions, please contact Lisa Skumatz at [email protected], or at 303/494-1178. Deadline listed above, so get your nominations in!

FIRST prepare two word documents – a summary of 150 words and then a document of up to 1000 words that addresses the criteria noted for your award (label each criteria section). The specific criteria are listed in the table below. THEN Click here for the link to the award form.

You will need: contact information for yourself and the nominee, 150 word summary, and up to 1000 words addressing the criteria relevant for your award (see check marks below). The criteria for the higher education award asks for information about degree programs and career services, applied research / tech transfer, and links with recycling industries. The criteria for other awards are listed in the following table. We recommend you prepare a document with these elements first, and then cut and paste your responses into the form.

Effect on recy-cling / hierarchy & Tons Coverage / longevity Innovation / leadership / cutting edge Program Economics Special criteria for Higher Education (noted above)
Lifetime Achievement (extra points if available)
Bill Heenan Emerging Leader (extra points if available)
Outstanding Recycling Organization
Outstanding For-Profit Business Leadership
Outstanding Non-Profit Business Leadership
Outstanding Community or Government Program
Outstanding Higher Education Program

Nominate Here

Posted in Uncategorized|

NRC Supports Federal Expansion of America’s Recycling Infrastructure

by Bob Gedert, President, National Recycling Coalition and the NRC Board of Directors – on behalf of the NRC members

In the President’s proposed fiscal 2018 budget, the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) annual budget allocation is proposed to be cut by one third. This cut would result in the elimination of over 50 programs and 3,200 jobs. Two of the programs proposed to be eliminated include the Sustainable Materials Management program and the Waste Reduction Model. Eliminating these programs will likely reduce critical support of the American recycling industry and negatively impact the American economy.

According to a recent statement from Ron Gonen of Closed Loop Partners, “These EPA programs analyze the way we consume, use and reuse materials and solid waste, providing tools and guidelines for industry, private companies and elected officials. The materials management and waste reduction programs guide investments into recycling facilities that sort and process material, and manufacturing infrastructure that utilizes these materials to make new products here at home – creating jobs in the process.”

It is disappointing to see proposed federal disinvestment in the recycling industry considering the jobs and opportunities recycling bring to our country, and the fact that the recycling industry is as large as the automobile industry. Infrastructure expansion into the recycling industry will bring new living wage jobs along with opportunities for the advent of new technologies in renewable energy and help businesses save money by being more efficient and reducing wasting.

One potential silver lining of the President’s budget proposal is new funding to support infrastructure redevelopment. Recently, the President toured the country announcing new transportation infrastructure funding for the airline industry, for the inland waterway transportation network, for dams and levee reconstruction, and for the federal highway system. The announcements throughout the “Infrastructure Week” outlined a series of proactive funding approaches aimed at revitalizing America’s decaying infrastructure.

The National Recycling Coalition (NRC) strongly supports efforts to invest and improve our country’s aging infrastructure. The recycling industry particularly needs a 21st-century transportation system to efficiently transport raw materials and feedstocks to manufacturers throughout the nation and the globe, including increased capacity and investment in all modes of transportation, covering rail, surface, and waterways. All infrastructure projects could generate far more jobs from the reuse and recycling of buildings and roads and the use of recycled and recyclable materials wherever economically and technologically possible (e.g., use of rubberized asphalt in road construction and use of rebar from ferrous scrap).

NRC also believes that investing in American recycling infrastructure would provide an excellent return on investment and leveraging of federal funds. Support of American recycling infrastructure would enable America to bring home recycling jobs from overseas, and dramatically expand the three-quarters of a million jobs and tens of billions of dollars already occurring in economic activity. Instead of shipping nearly half of all recovered recyclables to overseas markets, a refreshed recycling infrastructure will support new American end markets, manufacturers, and businesses creating closed loop material streams and lower transportation costs.

Today’s rapidly evolving waste stream requires an upgraded recycling infrastructure from collection to processing to manufacturing. Recycling industry experts note that the “evolving ton” reflects the light-weighting of plastic containers (PET), a significant reduction in newsprint (ONP) in the consumer stream, and a significant uptick in old corrugated containers (OCC) known as the “Amazon Effect” due to internet sales to home delivery. Single-stream material recovery facilities (MRFs) that service residential communities were not designed for these consumer shifts and are in need of redesign and expanded capacity. End-users and remanufactures also need to reflect these consumer shifts. The “evolving ton” creates pressure points throughout the value chain from consumer product redesign and sales all the way through the recycling system, requiring a full upscaling of the American recycling infrastructure.

The National Recycling Coalition urges citizens to contact your local Congressional Representative as the Federal Budget is debated and revised this summer, asking for support of the USEPA budget, as well as new infrastructure support for the American recycling system.

Investing in America’s recycling infrastructure is an investment in American jobs, in the American economy, and in reducing costs for businesses that will provide an excellent return for the investment of federal funds.

The National Recycling Coalition is a non-profit organization that is focused on the promotion and enhancement of recycling in the United States. We are 23-affiliated recycling organizations strong, and have a network of more than 6,000 members that extends across waste reduction, reuse, recycling, and composting. The organization works to maintain a prosperous and productive recycling system that is committed to the conservation of natural resources, as well as accelerate sustainable approaches to the management of discarded materials.

View a PDF Version of this Opinion Article

View this Opinion Article in Resource Recycling

2017 NRC Awards

NRC Awards – Nominations Due June 30, 2017 at 5pm EST!

The National Recycling Coalition announces the “Call for Nominations” for the 2017 Awards – with awards presented at the Resource Recycling Conference August 28-30, 2017 in Minneapolis. Spread the word!! Nominate the best programs or individual you know in the following categories:

  1. NRCs’s Lifetime Achievement Award – recognizing an outstanding individual with a lifetime of leadership and dedication to the field of recycling.
  2. Bill Heenan Emerging Leader Award – recognizing an outstanding individual aged 35 or under who has emerged as a leader in the field.
  3. Outstanding Recycling Organization – awarded to a State Recycling Organization with outstanding growth, programs, leadership, or which has made a substantial impact on the field.
  4. Outstanding Business Leadership – awarded to a for-profit company showing leadership, innovation, and success as a corporate model in recycling and diversion.
  5. Outstanding Non-Profit Business Leadership – awarded to a not-for-profit company showing leadership, innovation, and success as a corporate model in recycling and diversion.
  6. Outstanding Community or Government Program – awarded to a public (community / governmental) program showing innovation, progress, or success as a model for other public programs.
  7. Outstanding Higher Education Program – awarded to a college / university with an exceptional program in recycling or in connecting higher education and the industry in the areas of degrees, tech transfer, career services, etc.

Nominate Here

The criteria for each award follow. Nominate a worthy candidate (you may self-nominate) by clicking on the following link. For questions, please contact Lisa Skumatz at [email protected], or at 303/494-1178. Deadline listed above, so get your nominations in!

FIRST prepare two word documents – a summary of 150 words and then a document of up to 1000 words that addresses the criteria noted for your award (label each criteria section). The specific criteria are listed in the table below. THEN Click here for the link to the award form.

You will need: contact information for yourself and the nominee, 150 word summary, and up to 1000 words addressing the criteria relevant for your award (see check marks below). The criteria for the higher education award asks for information about degree programs and career services, applied research / tech transfer, and links with recycling industries. The criteria for other awards are listed in the following table. We recommend you prepare a document with these elements first, and then cut and paste your responses into the form.

Effect on recy-cling / hierarchy & Tons Coverage / longevity Innovation / leadership / cutting edge Program Economics Special criteria for Higher Education (noted above)
Lifetime Achievement (extra points if available)
Bill Heenan Emerging Leader (extra points if available)
Outstanding Recycling Organization
Outstanding For-Profit Business Leadership
Outstanding Non-Profit Business Leadership
Outstanding Community or Government Program
Outstanding Higher Education Program

Nominate Here

Upcoming Free Webinars!

Help Develop a Zero Wasting Plan for California!
June 15, 2017 from 10:00am – 11:30am PT
via GoToWebinar

California is leading the world in fighting climate change and modeling a sustainable future. Help keep that leadership going by taking part in the development of a Zero Wasting Plan for California!

Copyright, Eco-Cycle

Join us in building upon the results of the December Workshops and April Webinar:

  • Divertability Analysis (types, amounts and sources of materials)
  • Commodity Analysis (value of discarded materials)
  • Service Opportunity Analysis (what’s missing?)
  • Supply ($ paid to process materials) and Demand ($ paid for finished materials) Market Analysis
  • Zero Waste Planning Checklist (Policies, Programs & Facilities to achieve Zero Waste).
  • AB2020 immediate fix needed
  • Packaging waste reduction
  • Compliance with SB 1383 (75% reduction of organics to landfill by 2025)
  • Tools to Implement above topics (e.g. state and local legislation, model ordinances/agreements, grassroots organizing, consumer campaigns, certification and training)

Hear what CRRA Technical Councils are recommending to include in the Zero Wasting Plan. Offer your own suggestions to make sure the Plan addresses your vision of what CA should be striving for to achieve Zero Wasting.

Register Now!

Webinar Hosted by: National Recycling Coalition
Promotional Partners: Zero Waste USA, Zero Waste San Diego, Zero Waste Sonoma County, CRRA and Northern California Recycling Association

Brought to you by the Global Recycling Council of the California Resource Recovery Association and Zero Waste Brain Trust

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Register Now!

International Compost Awareness Week 2017

This year’s theme: Compost! Healthy Soil, Healthy Food
From May 7 – May 13, 2017

Effective materials management is key to the resilience and beauty of any community, but many municipalities have yet to tap the numerous social, environmental, and economic benefits of recycling organic materials.

By collecting food scraps and landscape trimmings, these materials can be transformed into a valuable resource through the process of composting. The final product is compost, a nutrient-rich soil amendment which can be cycled back into the community to improve residential gardens, municipal landscaping, and agricultural lands. It can also be used for other DPW purposes such as erosion control.

From May 7th through the 13th, join communities across the U.S. and around the world by helping to promote the use and benefits of compost. How? Below are some event ideas to try in your community:

  • Facilitate a “How-To Compost at Home” workshop
  • Host a compost sale or giveaway
  • Organize tours of residential or commercial compost systems
  • Spread the word through local news media
  • Engage K-12 students with a district-wide art contest
  • Use compost for planting trees or local community garden

For more information about International Compost Awareness Week, and for additional tips on how to celebrate, please visit compostfoundation.org/icaw


Join the Compost Challenge! Learn More Here

National Recycling Coalition Scholarships for Minneapolis Area College Students

National Recycling Coalition Scholarships for Minneapolis Area College Students

Apply by June 1, 2017

A limited number of scholarships are being awarded to college and university students in the Twin Cities area through the National Recycling Coalition (NRC).

The Murray J. Fox Scholarship Fund was created in 1994, when Murray Fox, a long-time supporter and member of the NRC, started a fund to provide scholarships to college students interested in recycling. Since then, the trust fund has endowed over $112,000 in scholarships to 66 college students.

This year, in addition to scholarships, recipients will receive complementary admission to the Resource Recycling Conference in Minneapolis, 8/28-30/2017 as well as a one-year membership to the Coalition.

To learn more about Murray and his amazing contribution to recycling and young people, read his bio here.

For more information, contact: [email protected]

 

Free Webinar: The Ultimate Guide to Writing a Mandatory Recycling Ordinance

Re-TRAC will be hosting this FREE webinar on May 3, 2017 at 10am PST/1pm EST.

Is your community looking for a new way to increase recycling and reduce disposal? How about regulating costs and extending the life of landfills? Register to attend this webinar to learn how to plan, write, and implement a mandatory recycling ordinance in your community.

After attending this webinar, you will:

  • be ready to start planning your own mandatory recycling ordinance
  • hear stories that will help you to avoid common pitfalls
  • be equipped with best practices to ensure your ordinance is practical and fair
  • receive a free Roadmap to Mandatory Recycling Planner to stay organized

Click Here for More Information

Click Here to Register

Behind the scenes: A Reuse Advocate’s role in Zero Waste policy

By MaryEllen Etienne

Reuse is well known as the “second R” in the reduce-reuse-recycle mantra used by environmental leaders across the globe. Perhaps the term conjures up that reusable bag sitting in your car trunk – but reuse is much more than this. It is a complex and critical component of true Zero Waste.

Espousing the benefits of reuse
It is clear that source reduction and recycling will only get us so far. We can’t achieve Zero Waste without reuse.

We don’t have to look much further than Toyota to see the vital ‘part’ reuse plays in corporate Zero Waste efforts. In the late 1990’s Toyota began replacing cardboard gaylords and wooden pallets with durable, reusable shipping containers to ship parts to dealerships. In the early 2000’s they began using these containers to ship parts from Japan to North America, then to distribution centers. Currently more than 65,000 reusable shipping containers carry 109 million parts annually through a network of 1850 dealers, 150 suppliers and 22 distribution centers. Toyota’s reuse efforts have saved 308 million pounds of wood, 185 millions pounds of cardboard and 445 million dollars in packaging costs since 2002.

In the nonprofit world, we can look to the Scrap Exchange to see how reuse is promoting creativity, environmental awareness and community development. Scrap Exchange is a national model creative reuse center in Durham, North Carolina. By collecting materials from local businesses and residents and selling reclaimed materials – the organization has created 32 jobs and diverts nearly 150 tons annually. With the recent purchase of over 105,000 square feet of commercial space they are poised to create the country’s first “Reuse Arts District” and national center to support reuse initiatives.

All this great work aside, it is important to note that reuse continues to be overshadowed by the “third R”, recycling. This is where reuse advocates come into play.

Making a timely connection
In April 2016, as a new member of American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) I started to get acquainted with the organization and its work. I had the great fortune to speak with Richard Eidlin, ASBC’s Vice President of Policy about my passion for reuse, its vital role in the broader concept of Zero Waste, and how it all factors into a circular economy. Just a few weeks later, he was approached by Maria Laverdiere, legislative aide to Congressman Keith Ellison (D-MN) to get feedback on their Zero Waste Bill. Richard immediately put me in touch with her.

Getting it right
My work with Maria and Richard began in earnest as I put a critical eye to Ellison’s existing Zero Waste Bill. On first read I noticed it prominently displayed the National Recycling Coalition’s (NRC) newly adopted definition of “recycling” – which, as a NRC Board Member, was wonderful to see and had resulted from Maria’s work with NRC’s Policy Committee in 2015. Upon further review, I noticed that the Bill’s language seemed to overlook reuse. Throughout the document it either skipped directly from waste reduction straight to recycling (missing the “second R”) or referred to a small segment of reuse by occasionally mentioning “product reuse”.

Overlooking reuse is not uncommon, however. I see it everywhere – from municipal waste management plans to corporate Zero Waste programs. It’s easy to confuse reuse with recycling and/or to underestimate its triple bottom line impacts, but I’m hoping that my fellow reuse advocates will educate policy makers and industry leaders, and hold them accountable for including, and even more importantly prioritizing, reuse in their Zero Waste goals and policies.

The other key elements I felt were missing in the legislation were definitions of waste prevention, reuse and Zero Waste. After walking Maria through my suggested edits and describing in more detail the role of reuse in Zero Waste and the circular economy, I began to mark-up the document.

I made the seemingly small but important revisions ensuring reuse was not skipped – and would take its proper place between waste reduction and recycling. Then, to complement the NRC’s definition of recycling, I added my oft-used definition of “reuse” – extending the life of a product, packaging, or resource by either using it more than once for the same or a new function with little to no processing, or repairing it so it can be used longer’. I then crafted a definition of “waste prevention” based on EPA’s use of term. Lastly, I added the peer-reviewed definition of “Zero Waste” which was developed by the Zero Waste International Alliance. Thankfully, these changes were embraced by Ellison’s staff.

In the meantime, I worked with ASBC to organize a Capitol Hill briefing on Zero Waste that was held on November 16, 2016. Congressman Ellison presented the updated document to policy-makers and leaders in the corporate and nonprofit community. The updates were well received and Maria set forth to incorporate the edits and feedback into a finalized document.

Answering the call to action
On January 26, 2017, Maria distributed an email stating Congressman Ellison’s intention to reintroduce the updated Bill known as “Zero Waste Development and Expansion Act of 2017” in the 115th Congress (H.R. 1034) on February 14, 2017. She also encouraged me, ASBC and others involved in the original Bill to show our support once again.

Now it is time to advocate for reuse and Zero Waste. I wholeheartedly agree with Maria’s sentiment and hope to elicit support for this potentially game-changing piece of legislation among my peers.

Let’s prove that eliminating wasteful practices and supporting more reuse and recycling will contribute to increasing jobs and helping those who need affordable food, furniture, clothing and other goods and conserving our resources. Let’s actively support building a viable reuse infrastructure and bring home the manufacturing jobs in recycling in an effort to rebuild infrastructure in America. Let’s also underscore that the reuse and recycling industry is as large as the automobile industry, and a little investment and supportive tax policies would pay off significantly to making America great again.

MaryEllen Etienne has been working in the field of sustainable materials management for over 20 years, with an expertise in reuse. She is the creator and executive producer of ReuseConex and is the author of “The Reuse Primer” and “The Reuse Movement Toolkit”. She can be contacted at [email protected]

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